Custom Products

Robotics and advanced automation technologies show enormous potential to revolutionize many fields.  While technology and markets have advanced to the point where robotics is becoming a necessity in many industries, advances in robotics research are often marooned in the laboratory, failing to make it into real-world use. The significant challenges involved in transforming research results into a real-world products remain a major stumbling block for many applications.

The team at Carnegie Robotics (CRL) has decades of experience successfully transitioning state-of-the-art technologies from the lab into commercial use.  This process requires both a deep knowledge of robotics and best-in-class engineering, but it cannot succeed without also addressing the business case, the needs of the end-user, reliability, maintenance, safety, certifications, and the dozens of other essential factors which are necessary for a product to succeed in the real world. To this end, our experienced project managers and engineers work closely with customers to develop complete robotic product solutions which fit their task and market requirements.  We will work with you to develop individual robotics components or complete robotic vehicles or platforms.

Carnegie Robotics developed this concept demonstrator robot for Rowbot Systems LLC. The semi-autonomous system operates between corn rows to apply liquid nitrogen fertilizer and cover-crop seed. 

Carnegie Robotics developed this concept demonstrator robot for Rowbot Systems LLC. The semi-autonomous system operates between corn rows to apply liquid nitrogen fertilizer and cover-crop seed. 

Carnegie Robotics serves as the early phase technology arm for an agricultural startup, Rowbot Systems LLC. Rowbot is commercializing a concept for fertilizing row crops with a fleet of small robots, the devices operating between crop rows to apply nitrogen fertilizer when the crop can most benefit. A single operator oversees the fleet and performs maintenance and routine support functions.  Rowbot Systems LLC came to CRL for access to a strong technical team that was able to build a fully operational concept demonstration system in under 8 months. The system was used to demonstrate the idea to farmers, farm cooperatives, investors, and other interested parties. By teaming with Carnegie Robotics as their technology developer, Rowbot has been able to leap forward with field demonstrations and overall product risk reduction much faster than if they had built a new technical team within the startup company.

Single strawberry plant (left). Image processing segments the plant image (right) prior to using machine learning algorithms to determine the quality of the plant.

Single strawberry plant (left). Image processing segments the plant image (right) prior to using machine learning algorithms to determine the quality of the plant.

CRL provides a high-speed (10+ plants per second) computer-vision-based sorting product for strawberry seedlings to a California-based customer.  This system must work in real-world farming conditions, with low-skill users, on a very wide range of plants.  CRL transitioned advanced machine-learning algorithms, licensed from Carnegie Mellon's National Robotics Engineering Center, to result in a smart learning system which can be trained on-the-fly to adapt to changes in field, plant, and environmental conditions.  CRL also developed the ruggedized, high-performance cameras, lighting, and processing hardware for commercial deployment of multiple systems, and provides support and upgrades to these systems in the field.

The Badger robot prototype responded to an international customer need for a fast-moving highly-terrainable explosive ordnance robot. This battery-powered 37 kg (100 lb) robot can carry a variety of payloads including manipulators and mission-specific sensors. The underlying technology was licensed from Carnegie Mellon and updated by CRL in 6 months to yield a platform with modular, sealed ‘wheel systems’, each with its own motor, drive train and suspension. While most small unmanned ground vehicles have trouble traversing gravel, rocks and rutted terrain, Badger is able to easily travel over gravel, rocks, logs and other debris, climb slopes exceeding 40° and travel at speeds exceeding 24 kph (15 mph).  The vehicle’s skid steering capability enables easy teleoperation, excellent close quarters maneuverability, and minimizes steering system complexity. 

Please contact Carnegie Robotics (sales@carnegierobotics.com) to arrange for a discussion of your application and product development needs.