Turning R&D into real products

A high speed in-feed belt (blue-green, foreground) moves plants under the vision system (blue and red canopy) at a rates above 60,000 plants per hour. Two air jet rails direct the plants exiting the belt according to their grade.

A high speed in-feed belt (blue-green, foreground) moves plants under the vision system (blue and red canopy) at a rates above 60,000 plants per hour. Two air jet rails direct the plants exiting the belt according to their grade.

The Pittsburgh Tribune Review talks about the mission of Carnegie Robotics in the context of the company's unveiling of its most recent product, a high-speed strawberry plant sorting machine.  The system uses high speed machine vision and machine learning to grade strawberry seedlings at very high throughput rates. 

The company recently installed a set of these machines in production facilities in California. The underlying technology is licensed from Carnegie Mellon University's National Robotics Engineering Center. 

Carnegie Mellon started work on it and, once perfected, it was turned over to Carnegie Robotics for the software. That has been fabulous. Nobody can touch it.
— Liz Ponce, General Manager of family-owned Lassen Canyon Nursery Inc. of Manteca, California.